New School Year, New GED® College Ready Graduates

The GED College Ready score levels are preparing GED graduates across the country for success in college classrooms.

As more college systems adopt the College Ready (CR) score levels, incoming GED graduates have more opportunities to bypass placement testing, skip remedial courses and possibly earn college credit for courses.

Approximately 225 colleges across the U.S. are known to have implemented one or both of the recommendations and many others have expressed interest.

The GED College Ready score (165-174, any subject) recommends that a student is waived from developmental education in that subject, waived from placement testing and/or placed directly in credit-bearing courses.

The GED College Ready + Credit score (175-200, any subject) includes the same recommendations as the College Ready score with the addition of 10 semester hours of college credit in that subject.

GED College Ready graduates enter college programs with an extra boost of confidence knowing that they have mastered some of the studying skills and subject knowledge they need to succeed in college-level courses. 

As more colleges recognize the importance of College Ready score level adoption, educators play an important role in advocating for GED graduates and the acceptance of the score levels. 

Adoption of the score levels not only increases the visibility and reputation of GED grads, it also brings additional awareness about adult education programs. 

As a champion for GED graduates and the score levels you help GED graduates transition more easily into jobs and college programs, increase the visibility of adult education for prospective students and student influencers and increase the visibility of your program’s work and successes. 

We encourage you to share GED success stories and information about the score levels online or in-person with students, policymakers and local media outlets. You can learn more about student outcomes data, the College Ready score levels and find additional tips about advocating for GED students in this presentation.

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